Monthly Archives: February 2018

Snow

Reasons to Use a Humidifier in Winter

Humidity is a major culprit for causing trouble in the summer, but a lack of humidity in the winter can come with its own problems. There are a lot of reasons why you should consider a humidifier in the winter that can benefit humans, pets, and even plants.

Skin

Any Colorado resident will tell you; winters are rough on the skin. Chapped lips, dry knuckles, and other symptoms start popping up, which can leave you feeling uncomfortable. Before you reach for the lotion, consider a humidifier to add moisture to the air.

Sinuses

When the air is too dry, your skin starts to dry out, and so does your respiratory system. Essentially, your nasal passages become dry and can’t protect as well against illnesses like colds and flu. Dry air makes you more susceptible to illness, and it can make it harder to fight off sickness once you contract it.

Plants

Research has shown that houseplants can help improve one’s mental state, as well as improve air quality. Not to mention, it offers a natural element of décor. Plants need sunlight and water to thrive, and part of how they get water is through the moisture in the air. Keep them happier and healthier with a humidifier.

Temperature

In the summer, too much humidity can make the temperature feel even hotter than it is. In the winter, let this principle work for you. More humidity raises the air temperature.

Protect the House

We’ve already mentioned how humidity is suitable for living things, but it’s also good for keeping a house stable. Wood, for example, can split and get damaged from a lack of moisture, and paint can potentially become brittle and crack. Essentially, everyone benefits from a home at a proper humidity.

modern living room

Contact the team at Total Comfort Heating and Cooling to get answers to all of your humidifier questions. We can help you find the right unit for your home and have your home feeling comfortable in no time.

Icicles

How Does a Furnace Work?

We all like being comfortable in our homes, and staying in a warm and cozy house in the winter is a feeling like no other. For those of you who are curious, or just like knowing how things work, we’ve got a quick guide to furnaces.

Fuel

Once upon a time, furnaces were fueled by coal or wood, but in the modern era, furnaces are fueled by either electricity, gas, or propane. Contemporary units are highly efficient and can convert most of the fuel into heat.

Forced Air

All furnaces operate on the same principle: forced air. Fuel produces heat, which then moves into the air. A fan pushes that warm air through a system of ducts, which then comes out as warm air through the vents in your home, thus heating the house. Air conditioners will typically use the same ductwork to push cool air, which is overall the most efficient layout for a house.

Gas and Propane Furnaces

Gas and propane furnaces are very similar. In a gas furnace, there is a pilot light (like on a stove) that ignites burners. The heat from the burners raises the air temperature to your thermostat setting; then fans push the air through the ducts.

Electric Furnaces

This type of furnace does not have a pilot light. Instead, the unit jump starts via electrical ignition. The actual heating element is a series of coils, and the warmer you want the air temperature, the more coils heat up. And like the other types of furnaces, the warm air is then distributed throughout the home.

Air Conditioning Repair

If you need to have your furnace inspected, or if you just need an annual check-up, give Total Comfort Heating & Cooling a call, and one of our technicians will come out to your home and take a look.